Myth: That by '71 antiwar activities among the troops were common and resulted in frequent refusals to leave the bases

Fact: There were certainly problems in the military, many of which reflected American culture at the time, but they were not common or frequent and were service wide, not just in Vietnam

  1. Fragging increased over time, reaching a high of 190 in 1970, but the murder of unpopular American officers dates back to 1781
  2. Drugs were in common use in the US among teenagers and young adults. Fifty per cent of incoming military in 1971 had used drugs prior to their entry into the service
  3. Antiwar activities within the military were frequently established, organized and promulgated by communist front organizations
  4. The military was under attack from many fronts as even the US legal system was used to undermine discipline
  5. There were highly publicized incidents of refusals to obey orders but they were the exception rather than the rule
  6. Problems with drugs and insubordination were more common in rear areas than among combat troops
  7. Although the incidents were troubling, they involved a small fraction of the troops in Vietnam
  8. 249 of the 2.644 million who served in Vietnam deserted.  Worldwide about 5,000 deserted when receiving orders to South Vietnam.
  9. Less than 10 antiwar events involving active military members were recorded throughout the war.  None occurred in Vietnam.
  10. The desertion rate during WWII was 55% higher than the desertion rate during Vietnam, indicating that Vietnam desertion rates were not outside the norm.

 

Confirming Evidence

Deserters Among the Missing

THE COLLAPSE OF THE ARMED FORCES

Heinl, Robert D., Jr. "The Military in Crisis." Human Events (1971): 452-65. Print.

DRUG USE BY U.S. ARMY ENLISTED MEN IN VIETNAM: A FOLLOW-UP ON THEIR RETURN HOME

"Fragging" and "Combat Refusals" in Vietnam

Professionalism Versus Managerialism in Vietnam

Comrades in Arms: How the Ameri-Cong Won the War Against the Common Enemy - America